Modern Inca pattern bringing Andean artisan weaving to carpet

Modern Inca pattern bringing Andean artisan weaving to carpet

Christophe Prosper Rammant
Christophe Prosper Rammant

Christophe is one of our founders and creative director. His passions are interiors, cooking, and traveling the globe for new inspiration.

When visiting Peru, we were in love with the colorful tapestry that featured intricate designs. This craft dates to 8000 BC, in which ancient peoples weaved vegetable fibers into baskets and other containers. Since ancient times, Peruvian textile was the primary way of people expressing their aesthetics and communicating. Ancient textiles featured original styles, motifs, and techniques that are still followed to this day by contemporary weavers. Our more minimal Inca pattern is a modern-day tribute to that rich history.

In 1420 AD, the Incas came into the picture. After many years of perfecting the art of textile weaving, the Incas became extremely successful in this craft. Inca patterns featured black, white, green, yellow, orange, purple, and red colors. Each color has its meaning. For instance, red was associated with conquest, while black was associated with death. The textile often featured geometric shapes and was made of cotton or llama, alpaca, or vicuña wool. The latter was reserved to the ruler because vicuña produced the softest wool and only the ruler could own herds of the animal.

Anyone could be a weaver in Incan times, but women were expected to become expert weavers. The best female weavers would often get relocated to Cuzco to weave for the nobility and the army. Clothing items maintained the same basic design and only changed depending on the weather of the region. Weavers would craft shirts, tapestry, bags, belts, headbands, and many more items. All these items were a representation of power to the Incans. The more clothing and accessories and accessories you had, the more powerful you were.

Inspired by the Incas’ advanced and truly mesmerizing craft, we created an Incan pattern custom carpet. This carpet features colors very similar to the ones the Incas would use and geometric shapes and motifs inspired by the tapestry we saw during our visit to Peru. The repetitive pattern in these unique colors allows you to add a unique feature to your next interior design project.

Contact the Talk Carpet team if you want to get an Inca pattern custom carpet or create your own from scratch. We offer nine different substrates, and you will get a custom carpet sample within just seven business days. We produce our carpets using ECONL yarn, which is a low-profile material made from recycled fabrics. Our custom carpet program is in partnership with DIFFA, in which we donate one percent of our custom carpet sales revenue to fight against AIDS/HIV.

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